Testimonials from Amazon – A Hairdresser’s Diary

Just read for the second time and it was even better! A must read by everyone that enjoys a laugh and a tear!
I can relate to so many stories in this book all hairstylist must read this book pure passion for the business
WOW Chris! When I went into fb and saw there was a suggested friend for me named ‘Christine Hannon’ I figured maybe it was the younger one…but NO it was YOU!! YAY! Then to find out you had written a book about your life and tales of hairdressing..some of which I had heard first hand from you a ‘few’ years ago as we sat having tea as friends or as I or my daughters Donna or Mindy sat having our hair done by you. In fact if I remember correctly my oldest daughter Donna was going through something at one time and you wrote a little poem for her. Now back to your book…so on May 6th I bought your book for my Kindle Fire and on May 7th @ around 11:45pm I finally could put it down…FINISHED! You see sometimes reading a book is easy and refreshing, like ice cream on a hot summer day. Compulsive and addictive, like a drug you just can’t get enough of..and these I found in reading Chris’s Memoirs. I cringed and cried at the life she lived as a child growing up but I first handed lay KNOW and have SEEN the BEAUTIFUL woman inside AND out that Chris has become due to the trials and tribulations she has gone through, and when Chris tells us she’s a ‘Chatty Cathy’ please BELIEVE it!! She is, but in the most awesome way! Thank you Chris for this awesome read! I CANNOT WAIT for the sequel
Lovingly Always
Debi xox
This book is a heartbreaking and beautiful story of Christine Hannons’ life as a stylist.
I couldn’t put this book down once I started it.
A great incite in what hairdresser’s go through. It gave a great incite to her life experiences. I highly recommend this book.
Christine Hannon’s story, A Hairdresser’s Diary, carries you on a journey from a life where she longs to be loved to one where she is not only loved but adored. It embraces accomplishment of her dream only to see it shattered most unexpectedly.
The hairdresser is more than a connoisseur of tresses: She is a confidant, psychologist and friend loved by most, revered by those closest to her and envied by no one. For Christine, hers is a story of immense gratitude even in the face of adversity.
You will find yourself at the intersection of many life-changing events where you will want to reach out to her, share in the moment, and lend a helping hand when so urgently needed. You will laugh at the incredibly funny stories, cry at thoughts of the uncontrollable pain, and share with her the most memorable endeavors.
Step back in time with Christine to an era before modern day technology: an era devoid of today’s amenities we so often take for granted.
To Christine: Your book left me wanting to know what happens next. Will there be a sequel? I certainly hope so for this reader definitely wants to continue along the journey.
Once I started reading A Hairdresser’s Diary I found myself right there with Chris. I was one of her customers, one of her friends and I was the one who wanted to console her during her pain and disrepair. This book is a real “could not put down” kind of story. I felt sad, angry, excitement, pride and accomplishment sometimes all those in one chapter.
A definite must read. you will not be sorry you did. I will now look at MY hairdresser in a whole new light.
This book engaged me from the beginning as Christine describes her difficult childhood. Even though she suffers hardships, many brought on by her family, she goes on to achieve her dream of becoming a hairdresser. The portion of the book in which she describes going to beauty school is fascinating, and she details many trade secrets along the way and lets the reader in on dealing with head lice as well as showing the glamorous side of the profession. As she begins her career she brings in fascinating details about her customers and the new fashion of using the seasons to determine what colors would best suit the customer. In school and on the job, Christine shows her heart as she helps customers with their problems. She relates how she has to adapt to new job situations and to a tragic accident that leaves her in constant pain and unable to pursue her career. Despite the setbacks she’s experienced, Christine’s sense of humor, love of her family and personal courage shine through in the pages of this book. As you read, you’ll not only learn a lot about hairstyling, but about how Christine handles life’s setbacks with determination and grace.
Chris Hannon did a wonderful job with expressing her life & feelings. Such a beautiful, strong & courageous woman. I thoroughly enjoyed reading thls book, from beginning to end. I can’t wait for the sequel…..Wendy Cook, Sydney,Cape Breton, Nova Scotia
Christine’s autobiography so clearly comes from her heart and soul and compels the reader to stay with it to the last word. I enjoyed the tale and wanted to hug her throughout, but particularly when she was still a toddler and being pushed away from her mother by her mother….how utterly heartless and unfathomable to me, the mother of two children myself, I could never imagine treating them thusly. She had the stalwart fortitude to stand up straight as her beloved Grandmother decreed and march forward under her own strength alone….well done you!!
I feel sure you have raised your children with love you missed all those years.
This is a must read story for anyone who thinks a bad life of downs holds you back. This story is so unbelievable you won’t be able to put it down. It keeps you wondering what will happen next in this woman’s life when she is down in luck but yet pulls herself back up and keeps on going forward to her dream and then… A must read can’t give it all away! Pick up your copy today you won’t regret reading this amazing story.
Christine Harmon’s journey from childhood to emancipated adult as chronicled by her diary is an interesting read and worth taking the trip with her. Despite the terrible cruelty of her mother and step-family she proves what grit and determination can do. She never gave up on her dream of becoming a hair stylist – from dolls to real people. She found strength in writing poetry and drawing along the way as well as writing in her diary. Against all odds and with help from unexpected sources she obtains not only her dreamed-of career, but love, marriage and a family of her very own. She held my attention despite the fact that I personally have never been interested in the “beauty” business.
Inspirational story of how dreams can become reality and struggles become blessings. I was unable to put this book down. The writing is refreshing and down to earth.
I found your story very interesting. I kept getting caught up in the story and having to backtrack to edit the section I just read. And the ending left me wanting to know more. Your story is so inspiring, especially that you maintain such a “can do”, positive attitude in sprite of all that has been thrown your way.

side from your life story, which was gripping, the view it gave of the changes in salon services (and clientele) over the decades was interesting from a historical perspective.
I remember the days of setting lotion and curlers, and ladies going out with their hair in curlers. I remember the shift to tousled, “natural” looks. I remember when the color seasons swept through America (I am a winter who always thought I was a fall-switching my color palette made a tremendous difference). It was fascinating to hear about all that change from the perspective of a stylist.
I wish you all blessings and joy. I hope that others can read your story and be touched by it as well.

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Tidbits from A Hairdresser’s Diary /Scissors Retired – part three

I wished that was the end of my suffering but some of it was just beginning. Chronic pain and surgery were two constants in my life. I was only twenty-seven and I was already been four times under the knife. This left me feeling lost overwhelmed and useless much of the time. Needing to find something, anything, to take my mind off my pain and frustrations, I started accepting a few of my former customers for hair appointments in my home. No one had a problem with the inexact schedule I was a slave to. When it rained, my friends and customers knew not to call for their hair needs on those days. My fingers and my back were far too painful to work. I was, at first, restricted to haircuts and styling, but gradually as I was stronger I was able to stand long enough to do the occasional colour or perm. This was a far cry from the customer base I had while working in a salon, but it kept my hand in my craft, and helped us a little financially. This made the few customers I accepted happy. But, I missed having my fingers entwined in the long hair I so desperately desired to help make me feel alive and creative.

1974 was the year that things would start to turn around for us, financially. Ron was promoted to salesman and one of the perks was a fully loaded company car, his own office and expense account. Ron worked so hard for this position and no one deserved it more. We splurged with a celebration dinner. The kids were so excited they could hardly wait to go for a ride in Daddy’s new car. Ron could hardly contain himself as well. He couldn’t wait to share with his mom – showing her just how far he had come, from being a truck driver for one of the largest gas companies to a salesman with his own car. His father had passed away from a heart attack June 1968. It saddened him he could not share this great news with him too. There was no doubt he would have been proud.

For the first time in our lives I now even had my very own car. We had come so far in these few short years. We long ago decided we would never pack up our tents and give up we were determined no matter what it took we would fight to survive. We would forge ahead to make our lives better, not just for ourselves but especially for our children. It was obvious both our families were proud of what we accomplished. Frank and Cathy in particular showed their support.

Since I had my own car and when I felt well enough I would go back to the old neighbourhood. There I would cut a few heads of hair or give our former next door neighbour, Hildie, her much needed colour. Three of those haircuts and styles were for the three women of the family who had lived across the street from us before we moved. Sharon’s husband was the architect who had built the tiny castle we now owned. I loved doing Sharon’s, Leslie’s and their mother, Mary’s hair. They wore the elaborate, high bouffant styles that allowed me to be creative. Leslie, at one time in her career, was a practicing hairdresser and had a room in their house set up as a mini salon. This made my job very easy, but made me miss the salon atmosphere even more. Although I suffered afterward with body pain, it was so satisfying for my soul and my ego.

The final words written for A Hairdresser’s Diary / Scissors Retired

Good morning all. It has been awhile since I have been here to visit with you. I can give you the whole list of excuses and most would be valid and accurate but who needs to be bored with those. Everyone has them and no one wants to hear them. So I will give you some good news. This past Mother’s day I wrote the final words to the sequel to A Hairdresser’s Diary. I was so excited to have finished although we all know it is not really finished. Now comes the hard part edit, edit, edit.

I though you might like a taste of what I have accomplished so far. For those who have read my first book this will make sense to you. For those who have not it might be a little confusing. Anyway here is a taste. I will add more to morrow.

A  Hairdresser’s Diary

Scissors Retired

Chapter One

It was a long and painful, five years that followed the devastating car accident that targeted me in mid-June of 1970. The memories were overwhelmingly painful for me. So horrifyingly vivid were those first hours after being hit by the unconcerned, uncaring drunk driver those memories remained fresh in my mind. The life altering accident happened in a split second, but in my mind, it repeatedly played back in slow motion. There were even freeze frame moments. I was overcome with anger as I recalled the way my back was twisted so severely and grotesquely. Seat belts were not installed in vehicles as of yet. I was sitting facing Ron, my husband, both my knees rested on the front seat, my feet on the console and my left arm on the back of the seat. Then, in a flash of a second, a drunk driver sideswiped us. He was driving a stolen car, and was on probation from prison and had no driver’s license. He was eventually charged with dangerous driving. When he hit us the whole top of my body twisted to the right. I hit my forehead on my passenger side window. My knees remained on the seat. I thank God that Ron was not badly injured, even though our car was totaled. Fast thinking and in shock, Ron was able to get us to the OPP station safely. He was smart enough to get the description of the car and had part of the license plate memorized. It was not long before an OPP officer had the driver in custody. Remorse was not in this uncaring person’s personality. For someone who caused so much devastation and destruction he got off easily, his sentence was few more years in jail. My sentence was far greater. Although I was the injured one, my sentence would be for life. How profoundly unfair, one drunk drivers inconsiderate choices changed the lives of a whole family. At the time, Ron and I did not know just how much fight God had instilled in us. In the next few years, we would have many an opportunity to show the world just what we were made of. I still remember those family members who thought these two, nineteen-year old kids wouldn’t last a year together, let alone have the guts and gumption to get through this life-altering circumstance.

Something cool to read by the pool – A Hairdresser’s Diary

cover finallulu

If you have not already read ‘A Hairdresser’s Diary’ now might be a great time to enjoy this inspirational memoir. You can find it at any of these links. Read the reviews and then write your own. You can get it in e-book or printed form. If you prefer an autographed copy you can now get a digital signature for your e-book on Amazon.ca or .com.

 

http://www.amazon.com/Hairdressers-Diary-looking-reflection-ourselves/dp/1475164289/ref=zg_bsnr_220855011_12

 

http://www.lulu.com/shop/search.ep?keyWords=A+Hairdresser%27s+Diary&categoryId=100501

 

http://www.ahairdressersdiary.com/

My granddaughter Shandra

Shanny 003 Shanny 002

Anyone that has read my book “A Hairdresser’s Diary” knows how much styling long hair meant to me and my career. My granddaughter Shandra is getting married this July . My dream has always been to be the one hairdresser of choice for all the brides in our family including in laws. Well I have been blessed as I have had that chance. What you are seeing in this picture is my granddaughter. This is the dry run before her wedding. You might ask why this would be necessary? well as most of you know I am just getting over another surgery this time on my left knee. Being the kind and considerate granddaughter that Shandra is, she has been concerned that I might cause myself pain either with my back or my knees on her wedding day and not be able to attend or enjoy her special day so she asked me to do her hair and take pictures now. This way I will have the pictures  of my loving work  for my ‘grandmothers album’ I am making for her. She looks like a Greek Goddess and I am proud to say she was in love with her hair. 

If you look hard enough you can see fine braided woven throughout her hair. This was one of my signatures that made my styles set apart from other stylists. Remember this was over 50 years ago and are no longer a rare embellishment. I enjoyed every second of this special day.

 

http://www.amazon.com/Hairdressers-Diary-looking-reflection-ourselves/dp/1475164289/ref=zg_bsnr_220855011_12

http://www.ahairdressersdiary.com/

 

A Dream come true for grandma

What an amazing feeling grandparents have when they are informed of the marriage of one of their grandchildren. The fact that we are even at an age that we can be part of this is even more interesting. This is the time when Ron and I are happy we got married young. We will be celebrating 49 years married Feb 1st and we will only be 69 years old when we are married 50 years so the excitement of great-grandchildren is also in the stars for us.

Now back to my exciting news. Shandra is Papa’s best girl and this is so exciting for him. But for me the excitement does not end there. It extends to something that makes me tingle all over with pride. For those who have read my book A Hairdresser’s Diary you will immediately know what I am referring to. That excitement stems from the fact that I, her grandmother will be doing her hair for her wedding. Her long flowing blonde hair. I will be able to once again use my creativity and love for styling long hair for my granddaughter on her special day. Even in my dreams I am running through every step of the process. I am creating curls, swirls and movement in my dreams. I have mentally laid out all the items and products I will need to create the perfect and most elaborate piece of artistry of my career. I can not even explain to you what an honour this is for me. It may sound silly to most of you but it is not silly to me.

Sandra is very concerned that if she lets me do her hair for her wedding that I might be in too much pain to enjoy this special day. So I had to promise her I would not do anything the week or so before so that doing her hair would not be too strenuous for me. She is seriously concerned that I might not be unable to enjoy myself if I am in pain.  I have to tell you that for this privilege I will endure the pain. This all sounds like the rambling of an old woman but it is indeed my dream come true.

Last month a hairdresser friend of mine made hair appointments for her, the bride and wedding party at a local salon. She said she was not interested in doing any hair on that day. She could not understand my excitement until she read my book. apologizing she said she completely understood now. When I told her my granddaughters wedding would be in my second book she asked me if she could also have the privilege of being in it too. I told her I had had many requests from other customers and friends and yes she could be in my sequel. My granddaughter suggested I include a picture of her hair on her wedding day as the finality to my book.

Sandra is our only granddaughter and Ronnie our grandson is only 7 so there is no fear of ever needing my creativity like this ever again.

I am so thrilled you can not even imagine.

Does any one remember these?

While I was putting my files together for my sequel for ‘A Hairdresser’s Diary’ I came across these picture I was going to put in the book. So I thought I would see how many of you remember ever seeing these items. These where some of the items that were in the Dungeon of Beauty in the basement, of the hairdressing school I attended over 50 years ago. I cringe at the thought of having to use them today. We thought at one time they were so new and innovative.

I have included the paragraphs out of my book so you can relate to the pictures. If you still use these you need to update lol lol.

Here is the story.

Even the basement of the school was very interesting and informative. It housed a museum set up to teach us the history of hairdressing. In the far corner, sat a huge machine from the year 1928 that had been used for perming hair. It had wires hanging down from the top of a cylindrical dome. The wires conducted heat to brass rollers, which in combination with a solution permanently curled the hair. The solution used to make the curls was very harsh and damaging, but vanity out weighted the risks. The contraption looked like something from a science fiction movie, something used for torture, definitely not like a machine used for beauty. Against the cement wall was a long wooden table, lined with very old curling irons, these in their time were placed in hot coals or heated on a wood stove, then used to make ringlets or curls. These were Marcel irons, named after the inventor. A separate table held curlers made of rag strips with wires in the center. These folded over like a billfold to hold them in place once the hair was wrapped around them. There were wooden rollers made from durable hardwood and held in place with wire clamps. Weirdly crimped, twisted wires, shaped in elongated u shapes were used for hairpins. The collection even had an old-fashioned, heavy, bulky barber chair, which showed many years of service. Off to one side sat an antique hair dryer that looked like something from outer space with its large, oval-shaped ridged hood. There was a full table of hand-made wigs from the early 1900’s, giving us a wonderfully dramatic look into the past. There was much to learn from the instruments and many interesting stories hidden in the basement, or as we came to call it, the dungeon of beauty.

 

 

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